Faculty and Staff - Visual Communication

  • Picture of Dr Melissa A Johnson

    Dr Melissa A Johnson

    Professor

    Biography

    Melissa A. Johnson is a Professor in the Department of Communication, where she has taught since 1994. Dr. Johnson’s research explores international communication and ethnicity-related concepts in traditional media, digital media, and public relations. Of particular interest is the role of visual communication in international news. A current stream of research examines the role of ethnic museums and cultural centers in building relationships among various cultural groups in urban settings. Dr. Johnson teaches classes in the networked society, international and intercultural communication, research methods, and public relations. She holds a doctorate in mass communication research from the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill.

  • Picture of Dr Devin Anthony Orgeron

    Dr Devin Anthony Orgeron

    Associate Professor

    Biography

    Professor Devin Orgeron teaches courses in Film Theory, Film History Since 1940, The New American Director, International Film and Realism, Documentary, and The French New Wave. He also teaches a range of director-focused courses covering filmmakers such as Alfred Hitchcock, François Truffaut, Howard Hawks, and the Coen Brothers. Dr. Orgeron researches and writes about cinema and mechanical mobility; cinematic masculinity; contemporary American cinema; film authorship; realism; advertising and commercial images; educational films; and postmodernity. He also collects, shows, and writes about home movies form the 1940s-1960s.

  • Picture of Dr Sarah R Stein

    Dr Sarah R Stein

    Associate Professor

    Biography

    Dr. Stein worked in documentary filmmaker, primarily as an editor, for 25 years before getting her doctorate at the University of Iowa in Media Studies. Her current research is in the mediation of rape in the military, and the portrayal of death in the popular media, from a critical cultural studies approach. Her publications in recent years have been co-authored with a number of CRDM students. Dr. Stein teaches classes on communication, culture and technology, film production, and feminist/critical/analytic perspectives.

  • Picture of Rebecca Ann Walsh

    Rebecca Ann Walsh

    Associate Professor

    Biography

    Rebecca Walsh's research focuses on theories of space and place, anthropocentrism and materiality, and transnationalism. She teaches classes on global modernism; transnational American Studies; world literature; and late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Anglo-American literature. She was recently elected Program Chair and has joined the Board of the Modernist Studies Association (2017-2020).

    She is author of the book The Geopoetics of Modernism (University Press of Florida, February 2015) and has guest-edited a special issue, "Global Diasporas," of the journal Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies, in addition to publishing essays and articles on race, American empire, and feminist theory. She holds a Ph.D. in twentieth-century literature from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  • Picture of Andrew R. Johnston

    Andrew R. Johnston

    Assistant Professor

    Biography

    I am an Assistant Professor in the Department of English and teach in the Film Studies Program as well as the PhD program in Communication, Rhetoric, and Digital Media. My research and teaching areas include film history and theory, animation, avant-garde film, color aesthetics, media archaeology, and areas of the digital humanities such as the history of computational technologies and digital archives. My forthcoming book, Pulses of Abstraction: Episodes from a History of Animation (University of Minnesota Press), is a theoretical and historical investigation of abstract animation in cinema and computational media from the 1950s through the 1970s. Highlighting a rich array of graphic techniques, such as etching directly onto the filmstrip, generating rapid, discontinuous montage sequences, or using digital vector displays and programming technologies, I argue that this aesthetic explores the parameters and contours of an expanded media landscape while offering the material out of which a more inclusive, flexible, and dynamic account of cinema can be built. I am also currently writing a series of articles about the historical development of Computer-Generated Imagery from the 1960s through the 1980s and methods of archiving and transcoding these works on contemporary platforms.

  • Dr Emily Winderman

    Assistant Professor

    Biography

    After earning her Ph.D. in Rhetorical Studies from the University of Georgia in 2015, Dr. Winderman is thrilled to join the Communication Studies faculty at NCSU.  Her research explores the role of public emotions in the constitution of collective identity in controversies related to women's reproductive healthcare.  In addition to exploring contemporary issues in women's reproductive health, Dr. Winderman also examines the function of emotional appeals in historical discourses so that we might better understand the development of our current reproductive moment.