Faculty and Staff - Cultural Studies

  • Picture of Dr William J Kinsella

    Dr William J Kinsella

    Professor
    Winston Hall 221

    Biography

    Dr. Kinsella's research and teaching address the overlapping areas of organizational communication, environmental and energy communication, rhetoric of science and technology, and rhetoric of public policy. He views these areas through an interpretive perspective based in critical theory, phenomenology, rhetoric, and discourse studies. He earned a bachelor's degree in physics (Manhattan College), pursued graduate studies in astronomy and physics (New Mexico State University) and worked as a science educator before completing his master's and doctoral degrees in Communication at Rutgers University. During 2010 he was a U.S. Fulbright Scholar at the Institute for Nuclear Energy and Energy Systems, University of Stuttgart, Germany. His work on nuclear energy communication has encompassed the areas of nuclear fusion, environmental cleanup across the US nuclear weapons complex, and commercial nuclear energy in US and global contexts.

  • Picture of Dr Helen J Burgess

    Dr Helen J Burgess

    Associate Professor
    Tompkins Hall 276

    Biography

    Dr Burgess has primary research interests in electronic literature, multimodal composition, physical computing and science fiction studies. Long a practitioner of scholarly multimedia publishing, she is coauthor of Red Planet (Markley, Higgs, Kendrick, Burgess 2000) and Biofutures (Mitchell, Burgess, Thurtle 2008), both in DVD-Rom format, and Highways of the Mind (Burgess, Hamming 2014, Penn Press), a multi-touch book for iPad. She is a member of the board of directors of the Electronic Literature Organization and editor of Hyperrhiz: New Media Cultures. She holds a PhD in English from West Virginia University.

  • Picture of Paul Fyfe

    Paul Fyfe

    Associate Professor
    Tompkins Hall 269

    Biography

    Paul Fyfe is associate professor in the Department of English and coordinator of NC State's Graduate Certificate in Digital Humanities. His research and teaching areas include British Victorian literature, the history of print and communications media, and a broad spectrum of digital humanities practices including cultural heritage visualization, content mining, digital pedagogy, and scholarly communications. He has published on Victorian studies topics including the books By Accident or Design: Writing the Victorian Metropolis (Oxford UP, 2015) as well as Victoria’s Lost Pavilion: From Nineteenth-Century Aesthetics to Digital Humanities (Palgrave Macmillan, forthcoming 2016), co-authored with an interdisciplinary team working on a virtual model of that building. He is currently pursuing analytics work on digitized nineteenth-century newspapers as well as studies of material texts from the Victorian era, supported by an Andrew S. Mellon Fellowship in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School.

  • Picture of Dr Sarah R Stein

    Dr Sarah R Stein

    Associate Professor
    Winston Hall 201V

    Biography

    Dr. Stein worked in documentary filmmaker, primarily as an editor, for 25 years before getting her doctorate at the University of Iowa in Media Studies. Her current research is in the mediation of rape in the military, and the portrayal of death in the popular media, from a critical cultural studies approach. Her publications in recent years have been co-authored with a number of CRDM students. Dr. Stein teaches classes on communication, culture and technology, film production, and feminist/critical/analytic perspectives.

  • Picture of Rebecca Ann Walsh

    Rebecca Ann Walsh

    Associate Professor
    Tompkins Hall 104

    Biography

    Rebecca Walsh's research focuses on theories of space and place, anthropocentrism and materiality, and transnationalism. She teaches classes on global modernism; transnational American Studies; world literature; and late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Anglo-American literature. She is author of the book The Geopoetics of Modernism (University Press of Florida, February 2015) and has guest-edited a special issue on global diasporas of the journal Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies, in addition to publishing essays and articles on race, American empire, and feminist theory. She holds a Ph.D. in twentieth-century literature from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  • Picture of Dr Stephen B. Crofts Wiley

    Dr Stephen B. Crofts Wiley

    Associate Professor
    Winston Hall 102

    Biography

    Stephen Wiley is an Associate Professor in the Department of Communication at North Carolina State University. He received his B.A. in Sociolgy and Anthropology at Swarthmore College, his master’s in Latin American Studies at the University of Texas at Austin, and his Ph.D. in Communication Research at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Most recently, Wiley was a Fulbright Scholar and visiting faculty member at the Universidad de Concepción in southern Chile, where he carried out ethnographic fieldwork to see the effects of globalization on ordinary people’s sense of place in the city of Concepción in 2008 and 2012.

  • Picture of Dr Chris Ingraham

    Dr Chris Ingraham

    Assistant Professor
    Winston Hall 220

    Biography

    Dr. Ingraham’s research focuses on the various ways that our contemporary moment is changing the traditional roles of discourse in democracy. Of particular interest to him is the importance of affect and art relative to citizen involvement in cultural public spheres and civil societies that are increasingly mediated by algorithms. He teaches courses in rhetorical theory and history as well as seminars on critical and interpretive inquiry in the study of culture and media. Among his publications are articles about vernacular rhetoric, archives, public libraries, transdisciplinarity, and algorithms. Dr. Ingraham joined the faculty at NC State in 2015 after finishing his Ph.D. in Communication at the University of Colorado-Boulder. He doesn’t like referring to himself in the third person.

  • Picture of Andrew R. Johnston

    Andrew R. Johnston

    Assistant Professor
    Tompkins Hall 230

    Biography

    I am an Assistant Professor in the Department of English and teach in the Film Studies Program as well as the PhD program in Communication, Rhetoric, and Digital Media. My research and teaching areas include film history and theory, animation, avant-garde film, color aesthetics, media archaeology, and areas of the digital humanities such as the history of computational technologies and digital archives. My forthcoming book, Pulses of Abstraction: Episodes from a History of Animation (University of Minnesota Press), is a theoretical and historical investigation of abstract animation in cinema and computational media from the 1950s through the 1970s. Highlighting a rich array of graphic techniques, such as etching directly onto the filmstrip, generating rapid, discontinuous montage sequences, or using digital vector displays and programming technologies, I argue that this aesthetic explores the parameters and contours of an expanded media landscape while offering the material out of which a more inclusive, flexible, and dynamic account of cinema can be built. I am also currently writing a series of articles about the historical development of Computer-Generated Imagery from the 1960s through the 1980s and methods of archiving and transcoding these works on contemporary platforms.